School and classroom environments support learning, creativity, safety and engagement.

Children learn best when they are in a safe school environment. A safe environment is one where students feel physically, emotionally, and socially comfortable. They know that their needs are taken care of and that they are protected by caring adults. One of the foremost advances in schoolwide discipline is the emphasis on proactive strategies like creating a positive, predictable, consistent and safe environment. Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) is a systems approach to support social competence and academic achievement.

For students to learn, they must attend school. A welcoming and accepting environment motivates students to attend school.

LCAP Actions Actions implemented this year
Implement, monitor, and continue to provide professional development and coaching in (PBIS) Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports. PBIS is a three tiered RtI approach. We need to focus on implementing Tier II and Tier III interventions based on the data. When a behavior event occurs, and resolution is given to the student, we will work on a positive approach to restore the relationships and expectations for the student. PBIS Training was provided to 257 staff members by December 13. The PBIS coach met monthly with sites’ PBIS/Leadership Teams to support their implementation plans. Training for Noon Duty Staff at four schools. The district PBIS coach provides support for individual classroom teachers in establishing clear routines and rituals, efficient transition times, and positive reward systems within the classroom setting, as a part of the larger school PBIS framework. The district coach initially facilitates a planning meeting with the teacher where areas of success and areas of need are discussed. The district coach then completes an observation and provides feedback to the teacher in order to identify areas of success, areas of need and develop a plan of action with the teacher. This plan can include the district Coach teaching a social skills lesson to address a classroom need, modeling positive behavioral interventions for the whole class or specific students, or partnering with another district coach to demonstrate an engaging and rigorous academic lesson with a positive behavior support system included throughout the lesson. This is repeated as often as needed in order to support the teacher and students. Meetings with the teacher can range from ½ hour to 1 hour-long, observations are typically 1 hour-long, and any follow-up co-teaching or modeling can range from ½ hour to 1 hour-long. 12 teachers were supported with this model. The district PBIS coach provides lesson planning and school-wide assemblies in order to address unwanted or bullying types of behavior. These lesson are based on the STOP / WALK / TALK curriculum within the PBIS framework. The district coach plans and develops presentations incorporating the curriculum, current events, and videos depicting ways to make the school a safe place. The PBIS coach works with the school administrator and PBIS teams in the planning, development and implementation of the bully proofing assembly and lesson plans. The PBIS Coach also trains staff in how to implement the STOP /WALK / TALK procedures at each school, as it pertains to that school’s climate. The assemblies typically last between 2-3 hours (typically three 30- 45 min assemblies for kindergarten, primary, and upper grade levels) and the planning ranges from 2-3 hours per school. For one of the middle schools, the PBIS coach developed a presentation and teacher script that can be used school wide to incorporate ways to prevent and stop bullying behaviors as well as teach social skills for how to be a upstander. The PBIS Coach provides trainings for team members, such as PBIS teams and support staff teams, in Check-In / Check-Out (CICO), which is an evidence-based Tier 2 behavioral intervention. This training involves (a) delivery of the information regarding the CICO, (b) facilitation of a CICO team, (c) support and coaching in the development of the CICO process and data collection that best suits the needs of that school and its students. The training is typically a 1.5 hour long training for either PBIS teams or support staff teams, depending upon how the school has set up their process. The PBIS Coach provides trainings for team members, such as PBIS teams and support staff teams, in Check-In / Check-Out (CICO), which is an evidence-based Tier 2 behavioral intervention. This training involves (a) delivery of the information regarding the CICO, (b) facilitation of a CICO team, (c) support and coaching in the development of the CICO process and data collection that best suits the needs of that school and its students. The training is typically a 1.5 hour long training for either PBIS teams or support staff teams, depending upon how the school has set up their process.
Ensure all facilities and sites are safe and provide positive learning environments.Ensure all facilities and sites are safe and provide positive learning environments. We completed the Williams Act visits to ensure that all the school facilities were safe and met compliance. Several schools received new roofs and air conditioners during the Summer of 2016.
Provide student safety on the bus. The transportation department monitors and ensures that all buses are operating safely. The department also works with school principals on establishing a safe ride to and from school with clear behavior expectations.
Provide Mental Health Services to Students. Explore providing mental health counselors for the intermediate schools. School Link Services coordinators are linking agencies to families when a referral is made and it is appropriate. Social work interns and school psychologists also serve student’s on site mental health needs. This school year there have been 104 referrals through School Link Services, and all were linked with family and or therapeutic support. Eleven families attending the Strengthening Family Series, and 6 parents attended an evening PBIS/behavior support training offering.
Maintain Therapeutic Crisis Intervention (TCI). In order to support Tier 3 of the multi-tiered support system, the PBIS Coach is also trained in Therapeutic Crisis Intervention (TCI), along with 2 other district trainers. TCI is another pyramid framework that involves the training of de-escalation skills, behavior support techniques, emotional support during a student’s crisis and (if ultimately necessary) restraints to ensure staff and student safety. TCI is typically implemented for students who require more intensive interventions; however, some of the skills such as active listening and behavior supports can be implemented as Tier 2 interventions as well. The District PBIS Coach and two other TCI trainers provide professional development and training to both certificated and classified staff in TCI in order to minimize student crisis, positively support student behavior, and keep students in the Least Restrictive Environment (LRE). The 2 day De-Escalation training (16 hours) includes classified and certificated staff (middle school gen ed, special ed, IAs, counselors, teachers in charge, support staff) who are trained in crisis prevention and de-escalation techniques. The 4 day Full Training (32 hours) includes classified and certificated staff (special ed, IAs, support staff, teachers in charge, administrators) who are trained in crisis prevention and de-escalation techniques, as well as safety restraint techniques. The 1 day Refresher (8 hours) includes classified and certificated staff who have been previously certified in TCI and receive a refresher every other year to maintain certification. The TCI workshop (2 hours) is a training in crisis prevention and de-escalation techniques that general education teachers can use in the classroom. The TCI trainers also help facilitate the school’s Special Education staff (teachers, IAs, administrators, support staff) in the review of de-escalation techniques, restraints, and come up with emergency procedures and communication methods. August 4—1 day refresher to maintain certification.

Trainings proved in 2016-17:
2 day De-Escalation Training (16 hours 11 participants
4 day Full TCI Training (32 hours) 16 participants
1 day TCI Refresher (8 hours) 58 participants
TCI Workshops (2 hours) 163 participants
TCI Site Review (1.5 hours) 49 participants

Provide academic counselors at the intermediate schools. Each intermediate school has two academic counselors. There is one mental health counselor who is itinerant between the three intermediate schools.
District provides additional Patrol Services and Alarm Response at Title I Schools to ensure campus security in support of student learning and parent engagement Graffiti and vandalism can cost a school a great deal of money in repairs. They also may contribute to a perception that the school is not well-cared for and is an unsafe environment for students and staff. Because the writing of graffiti and acts of vandalism are usually carried out in secret, schools may discover that these types of misbehavior are difficult to curb. To reduce the amount of graffiti and vandalism that can occur at the four Title 1 Schools and Davis Intermediate School, additional Patrol and Alarm Response services were provided.
Compared to more affluent students, children living in poverty are 25 percent more likely to miss three or more days of school per month (National Center for Education Statistics [NCES] 2006a). Low socioeconomic status (SES) children are more likely to experience serious health problems (Hughes and Ng 2003; Rothstein 2004). As a result, they are three times more likely to be chronically absent from school due to illness or injury (Bloom, Dey, and Freeman 2006). Specifically, children living in poverty suffer much higher rates of asthma, heart and kidney disease, epilepsy, digestive problems, as well as vision, dental, and hear disorders (Case et al. 2002; Halfon and Newacheck 1993; Moonie et al. 2006). We will provide an additional two hours of health clerk time at each school in order to support families with student attendance and health concerns. Our health clerks are working an additional two hours daily so as to support follow-up on attendance for the students at our schools. Research reinforces the value of coming to school on time every day as a critical element in student learning progress towards meeting standards. Communication with parents is critical in supporting student attendance by reminding parents and emphasizing the impact of daily attendance on student achievement.
At our Title I schools, there is a need for a bilingual psychologist to serve students in their primary language to best meet the needs of our students and community. A bilingual psychologist now works at some of our Title I schools. Fluid and fluent communication is critical in building understanding and comprehension with students and their families. Many of our students in Title I schools are Spanish-speaking and having a bilingual psychologist to assist in conveying information and understanding their needs and concerns is essential in establishing strong foundational relationships.